{New Releases} Week 47 (Nov. 14-20)

They Can't Kill Us All by Wesley LoweryThey Can’t Kill Us All: Ferguson, Baltimore, and a New Era in America’s Racial Justice Movement by:Wesley Lowery
The first book to go behind the barricades of #blacklivesmatter to tell the story of the young men and women who are calling for a new America.

In a closely reported book that draws on his own experience as a young biracial journalist, Washington Post reporter Wesley Lowery tells the story of the year that shook America. From the killings of Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Florida and Mike Brown in Ferguson, Missouri to the death of Freddie Gray in Baltimore, Maryland, with a stop in Selma, Alabama along the way, Lowery takes readers to the front lines of history as it unfolds. The repercussions of police violence have sent citizens into the streets proclaiming that Black Lives Matter and politicians scrambling for a new way of understanding the basic social contract between the governed and those who govern.

With bracing intensity and incredible access, Lowery examines the economic, political and personal histories that inform this movement, and place what it has accomplished–and what remains to be done–in the context of the last fifty years of American history. By also telling the story of his own life growing up biracial in Cleveland, Ohio, the son of a black journalist, he will explain the roles that hope and optimism play in shaping one’s own identity.

They Can’t Kill Us All is a galvanizing book that offers more than just behind-the-scenes coverage of the story of citizen resistance to police brutality. It will also explain where the movement came from, where it is headed and where it still has to go.
Release: 11/15/16
Click to purchase: (Kindle)(Hardcover)(Audible)(Audio CD)

Writing to Save a Life by John Edgar WidemanWriting to Save a Life: The Louis Till File by:John Edgar Wideman
An award–winning writer traces the life of the father of iconic Civil Rights martyr Emmett Till—a man who was executed by the Army ten years before Emmett’s murder. An evocative and personal exploration of individual and collective memory in America by one of the most formidable Black intellectuals of our time.

In 1955, Emmett Till, aged fourteen, traveled from his home in Chicago to visit family in Mississippi. Several weeks later he returned, dead; allegedly he whistled at a white woman. His mother, Mamie, wanted the world to see what had been done to her son. She chose to leave his casket open. Images of her brutalized boy were published widely. While Emmett’s story is known, there’s a dark side note that’s rarely mentioned. Ten years earlier, Emmett’s father was executed by the Army for rape and murder.

In Writing to Save a Life, John Edgar Wideman searches for Louis Till, a silent victim of American injustice. Wideman’s personal interaction with the story began when he learned of Emmett’s murder in 1955; Wideman was also fourteen years old. After reading decades later about Louis’s execution, he couldn’t escape the twin tragedies of father and son, and tells their stories together for the first time. Author of the award-winning Brothers and Keepers, Wideman brings extraordinary insight and a haunting intimacy to this devastating story.

An amalgam of research, memoir, and imagination, Writing to Save a Life is completely original in its delivery—an engaging and enlightening conversation between generations, the living and the dead, fathers and sons. Wideman turns seventy-five this year, and he brings the force of his substantial intellect and experience to this beautiful, stirring book, his first nonfiction in fifteen years.
Release: 11/15/16
Click to purchase:(Kindle)(Hardcover)(Audible)

Courage to Soar by Simone BilesCourage to Soar: A Body in Motion, A Life in Balance by: Simone Biles
Simone Biles’ entrance into the world of gymnastics may have started on a daycare field trip in her hometown of Spring, Texas, but her God-given talent, passion, and perseverance have made her one of the top gymnasts in the world, as well as a four-time winner of Olympic gold in Rio de Janeiro.

But there is more to Simone than the nineteen medals-fourteen of them gold-and the Olympic successes. Through years of hard work and determination, she has relied on her faith and family to stay focused and positive, while having fun competing at the highest level and doing what she loves. Here, in her own words, Simone takes you through the events, challenges, and trials that carried her from an early childhood in foster care to a coveted spot on the 2016 Olympic team.

Along the way, Simone shares the details of her inspiring personal story-one filled with the kinds of daily acts of courage that led her, and can lead you, to even the most unlikely of dreams.
Release: 11/15/16
Click to purchase: (Kindle), (Hardcover), (Audible), (Audio CD)

Born a Crime by Trevor NoahBorn a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by:Trevor Noah
Trevor Noah is one of the comedy world’s brightest new voices, a light-footed but sharp-minded observer of the absurdities of politics, race, and identity, sharing jokes and insights drawn from the wealth of experience acquired in his relatively young life. As host of “The Daily Show with Trevor Noah,” he provides viewers in America and around the globe with their nightly dose of biting satire, but here Noah turns his focus inward, giving readers a deeply personal, heartfelt, and humorous look at the world that shaped him.

Noah was born a crime, the son of a white Swiss father and a black Xhosa mother, at a time when such a union was punishable by five years in prison. Living proof of his parents’ indiscretion, Trevor was kept mostly indoors for the first years of his life, bound by the extreme and often absurd measures his mother took to hide him from a government that could, at any moment, take him away. Finally liberated by the end of South Africa’s white rule, Trevor and his mother set forth on a grand adventure, living openly and freely and embracing the opportunities won by a centuries-long struggle.

A collection of eighteen personal essays, BORN A CRIME tells the story of a mischievous young boy who grows into a restless young man as he struggles to find himself in a world where he was never supposed to exist. BORN A CRIME is equally the story of that young man’s fearless, rebellious, and fervently religious mother—a woman determined to save her son from the cycle of poverty, violence, and abuse that ultimately threatens her own life.

Whether subsisting on caterpillars for dinner during hard times, being thrown from a moving car during an attempted kidnapping, or just trying to survive the life-and-death pitfalls of dating in high school, Trevor illuminates his curious world with an incisive wit and an unflinching honesty. His stories weave together to form a moving and searingly funny portrait of a lovable delinquent making his way through a damaged world in a dangerous time, armed only with a keen sense of humor and a mother’s unconventional, unconditional love.
Release: 11/15/16
Click to purchase: (Kindle), (Hardcover), (Audible), (Audio CD)

swing-time-by-zadie-smithSwing Time by:Zadie Smith
An ambitious, exuberant new novel moving from North West London to West Africa, from the multi-award-winning author of White Teeth and On Beauty.

Two brown girls dream of being dancers—but only one, Tracey, has talent. The other has ideas: about rhythm and time, about black bodies and black music, what constitutes a tribe, or makes a person truly free. It’s a close but complicated childhood friendship that ends abruptly in their early twenties, never to be revisited, but never quite forgotten, either.

Tracey makes it to the chorus line but struggles with adult life, while her friend leaves the old neighborhood behind, traveling the world as an assistant to a famous singer, Aimee, observing close up how the one percent live.

But when Aimee develops grand philanthropic ambitions, the story moves from London to West Africa, where diaspora tourists travel back in time to find their roots, young men risk their lives to escape into a different future, the women dance just like Tracey—the same twists, the same shakes—and the origins of a profound inequality are not a matter of distant history, but a present dance to the music of time.
Release: 11/15/16
Click to purchase: (Kindle), (Hardcover), (Paperback)(Audible)

How To Find A Fox by Nilah MagruderHow To Find A Fox by:Nilah Magruder
Equipped with a camera and determination, a little girl sets out to track down an elusive red fox. But foxes are sneaky, and it proves more difficult than she thought.

Nilah Magruder’s debut picture book charmingly tells the story of what it means to not give up and how sometimes what you’re looking for is closer than you think.
Release: 11/15/16
Ages: 4 to 8
Click to purchase: (Kindle) or (Hardcover)

archaeologies-of-slavery-and-freedom-in-the-caribbean-by-lynsey-a-batesArchaeologies of Slavery and Freedom in the Caribbean: Exploring the Spaces in Between by:Lynsey A. Bates, John M. Chenoweth, James A. Delle
Caribbean plantations and the forces that shaped them—slavery, sugar, capitalism, and the tropical, sometimes deadly environment—have been studied extensively. This volume brings together alternate stories of sites that fall outside the large cash-crop estates. Employing innovative research tools and integrating data from Dominica, St. Lucia, the Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Barbados, Nevis, Montserrat, and the British Virgin Islands, the contributors investigate the oft-overlooked interstitial spaces where enslaved Africans sought to maintain their own identities inside and outside the fixed borders of colonialism.

Despite grueling work regimes and social and economic restrictions, people held in bondage carved out places of their own at the margins of slavery’s reach. These essays reveal a complex world within and between sprawling plantations—a world of caves, gullies, provision grounds, field houses, fields, and the areas beyond them, where the enslaved networked, interacted, and exchanged goods and information.

The volume also explores the lives of poor whites, Afro-descendant members of military garrisons, and free people of color, demonstrating that binary models of black slaves and white planters do not fully encompass the diversity of Caribbean identities before and after emancipation. Together, the analyses of marginal spaces and postemancipation communities provide a more nuanced understanding of the experiences of those who lived in the historic Caribbean, and who created, nurtured, and ultimately cut the roots of empire.
Release: 11/15/16
Click to purchase: (Hardcover)

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